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4th Grade Visual Art Curriculum

Hager & Crabbe Elementary School

Fourth Grade Art Curriculum

“Abstract & Realism”
 

Month

Unit Objectives/
Big Ideas

Essential Questions

National Core Arts Standards, Visual Arts

Competencies

Vocabulary

August

 

ABSTRACT vs. REALISTIC ART

 

NONOBJECTIVE ART

 

  1. What makes an artwork abstract? Realistic?
  2. How do we categorize nonobjective art?

 

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

  • Students will be introduced to proper handling of materials and equipment management
  • Students will be able to define abstract art as artwork made of lines, shapes, and colors, with no real or recognizable image
  • Students will be able to define realistic art as artwork that looks real, with a recognizable image

ABSTRACT

REALISTIC

NONOBJECTIVE

 

September

NONOBJECTIVE ART

 

  1. How can different elements of abstract art—lines, shapes, colors—provide different meanings or feelings for the viewer?
  2. Can an artwork have identifiable parts but still be nonobjective or abstract? How?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

  • Students will examine existing nonobjective artworks and respond to artists’ choices in line, shape, and color
  • Students will create artworks in the style of a nonobjective artist’s work

SHAPE

WASSILY KANDINSKY

SHARON JOHNSTONE

CONCENTRIC CIRCLE

COLOR

October

ABSTRACT: INSPIRED BY REAL OBJECTS

  1. Can a nonobjective or abstract artwork be inspired by a real object? How?
  2. What compositional techniques make a successful design?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

  • Students will analyze existing artworks that seem nonobjective, but may be inspired by the shapes, colors, and lines found in real objects
  • Students will utilize compositional techniques to create an abstract artwork based on a real object

OVERLAP

RUNOFF

REPETITION

SCALE

LINE

DETAIL

COMPOSITION

DESIGN

November

RADIAL ART

  1. Where in the world have you seen radial designs? Consider natural radial designs as well as manmade radial designs.
  2. Does an artwork have to be symmetrical to be balanced? Can an asymmetrical artwork be balanced?
  3. What could a radial design represent (based on colors, shapes, lines, patterns)?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

 

  • Students will explore the concept of the radial design by viewing examples of cultural mandalas, natural-occurring radial designs (plants, fruits), and existing artworks that feature radial designs
  • Students will create balanced radial designs and reflect on the meaning of the colors, patterns, shapes, and/or lines represented within the work

RADIAL DESIGN

SYMMETRY

BALANCE

ASYMMETRY

LINE

REPETITION

December

RADIAL ART (Continued)

 

 

  1. Where in the world have you seen radial designs? Consider natural radial designs as well as manmade radial designs.
  2. Does an artwork have to be symmetrical to be balanced? Can an asymmetrical artwork be balanced?
  3. What could a radial design represent (based on colors, shapes, lines, patterns)?

 

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

 

  • Students will explore the concept of the radial design by viewing examples of cultural mandalas, natural-occurring radial designs (plants, fruits), and existing artworks that feature radial designs
  • Students will create balanced radial designs and reflect on the meaning of the colors, patterns, shapes, and/or lines represented within the work

RADIAL DESIGN

SYMMETRY

BALANCE

ASYMMETRY

LINE

REPETITION

January

SPACE
(IN DESIGN)

&

MOVEMENT
(IN ART)

  1. What purpose does space (positive and negative) serve in works of art?
  2. Why is it important for colors to stand apart or contrast in works of art?
  3. Can space between objects or shapes change the meaning or mood of a work of art? How?
  4. How can shapes, colors, and lines be manipulated to trick the eye?
  5. How do artists use tools and techniques to express their ideas?
  6. What is the purpose of the illusion of movement in art?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

 

  • Students will examine the use of positive and negative space in existing works of art and analyze each space’s purpose
  • Students will create an artwork that utilizes purposeful positive and negative space and shapes
  • Students will analyze works of art that give the illusion of movement, examining how lines, shapes, and colors interact to create the illusion
  • Students will practice creating an artwork that provides the illusion of movement

POSITIVE SPACE

NEGATIVE SPACE

NOTAN

OP ART

BRIDGET RILEY

VICTOR VASARELY

MOVEMENT

SPACE

SU BLACKWELL

MATT MCCONNELL

SCULPTURE

INSTALLATION

CONTRAST

METAPHOR

 

 

February

SPACE
(IN DESIGN)

&

MOVEMENT
(IN ART)

(Continued)

 

 

  1. What purpose does space (positive and negative) serve in works of art?
  2. Why is it important for colors to stand apart or contrast in works of art?
  3. Can space between objects or shapes change the meaning or mood of a work of art? How?
  4. How can shapes, colors, and lines be manipulated to trick the eye?
  5. How do artists use tools and techniques to express their ideas?
  6. What is the purpose of the illusion of movement in art?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

 

 

  • Students will examine the use of positive and negative space in existing works of art and analyze each space’s purpose
  • Students will create an artwork that utilizes purposeful positive and negative space and shapes
  • Students will analyze works of art that give the illusion of movement, examining how lines, shapes, and colors interact to create the illusion
  • Students will practice creating an artwork that provides the illusion of movement

POSITIVE SPACE

NEGATIVE SPACE

NOTAN

OP ART

BRIDGET RILEY

VICTOR VASARELY

MOVEMENT

SPACE

SU BLACKWELL

MATT MCCONNELL

SCULPTURE

INSTALLATION

CONTRAST

METAPHOR

 

March

BOUNDARIES
OF ABSTRACTION AND REALISM

  1. Can an artwork be simultaneously abstract and realistic? How?
  2. Is an artwork more or less successful depending on its degree of realism or abstraction? Explain.

 

 

 

  • Students will examine works of art that could be classified as either abstract, realistic, or both

CHUCK CLOSE

PORTRAIT

SELF-PORTRAIT

PHOTOREALISM

GRID

 

 

April

HERITAGE

  1. What is heritage? How does our personal heritage impact our art?
  2. Can viewers of art make meaning of someone else’s heritage?
  3. Does a viewer’s interpretation of art have to match what the artist intended? Why or why not?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

  • Students will explore heritage in existing works of art and respond to its perceived meanings
  • Students will create a work of art that incorporates an aspect of their personal heritage

HERITAGE

JOE BRAVO

PORTRAIT

May & June

SCALE

  1. Can an artwork be considered realistic if it is not proportionate to its real-life subject? Why or why not?
  2. What aspects of an artwork—sculpture, painting, drawing, etc.—should be considered in making a realistic rendering?
  3. Should an artwork serve a purpose or function? Why or why not?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a

 

  • Students will respond to examples of existing art that are realistic in all aspects but scale—miniature artworks as well as larger-than-life works of art
  • Students will create works of art that are realistic but do not match the scale or proportion of the real-life subject, choosing whether or not to make the artwork functional

SHAY AARON

SCALE

HYPER-REALISM

TEXTURE

DETAIL

FORM

PURPOSE

All Year

ABSTRACT & REALISM

  1. How does collaboration expand the creative process?
  2. Why do artists follow or break from established traditions?
  3. How do artists work?
  4. How do artists and designers learn from trial and error?
  5. How do artists and designers care for and maintain materials, tools, and equipment?
  6. Why is it important for safety and health to understand and follow correct procedures in handling materials, tools, and equipment?
  7. How do artists grow and become accomplished in art forms?
  8. How does learning about art impact how we perceive the world?

VA:Cr1.1.4a VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.1.4a

VA:Cr2.2.4a

VA:Cr2.3.4a

VA:Cr3.1.4a

VA:Pr4.1.4a

VA:Pr5.1.4a

VA:Pr6.1.4a

VA:Re.7.1.4a

VA:Re.7.2.4a

VA:Re8.1.4a

VA:Re9.1.4a

VA:Cn10.1.4a

VA:Cn11.1.4a